Why Do We Resist Change?

DSO in Chicago, IL

Change is scary. Change forces us out of our comfort zones and into the unknown, often into situations outside our control. We are afraid of change because we are afraid that this new challenge might make us look foolish, feel less capable, or even fail.

Change is also necessary. It is impossible to grow your practice, increase your service offerings, or stay competitive without change. Dentistry is a dynamic field, with new technologies and creative techniques being explored continuously. It is critical to be open to exploring these changes and to implementing the ones that will best improve your practice.

Unfortunately, one of the realities you may face is that your most loyal and long-term team members may be the ones who are most resistant to accepting these changes in your practice.

Over time, people tend to develop routines to perform their tasks. On one hand, this can be beneficial, as it can ensure consistency in job performance and can simplify the training of new employees. Often, these team members take pride in mastering the routine of their position and equate this with mastery of their role in the practice.

On the other hand, routines can lead to complacency, which can be devastating for your practice. Complacency can cause team members to “go through the motions,” putting less thought and effort into their routine, and may make their work become sloppy over time. A complacent employee is unwilling to change their routine to embrace the new ideas, methods, or technologies that you need to better serve your patients and grow your business. A complacent employee can even harm team morale and slow the adoption of the changes you seek to implement.

How do you protect your office from complacency and promote change as a part of your practice?

First, create an atmosphere of change. Start small, but design a series of changes to be implemented over the next few weeks or months in your practice. Make the idea of change something that is a normal and accepted part of your routine. This will make bigger changes easier to implement when the time comes.

Second, talk to your team. Make sure every team member understands the changes you want to implement, your reasons for making the changes, and your expectations of their compliance. Be open to answering questions, but do not allow “that’s not how we’ve always done things” to be a reason to slow or avoid changes.

Finally, make your team and yourself accountable for the changes. Track that your changes are in place and that every team member is on board. Meet with your team and discuss the outcomes of the change and how everyone feels about the change. Celebrate victories and strategize improvements. When your team is able to own the change and its outcome, it will be easier to implement the next and to suggest new ideas for future change.

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Things to Consider Before Buying New Dental Equipment

Chicago DSO

No matter how well-equipped your office is initially, time, wear, and changes in technology will at some point require you to purchase additional or replacement equipment. There are a few points you may wish to keep in mind before making your final decision on a major equipment purchase for your practice.

First, take your time. Like with any other major purchase, rushing into a decision can be costly. Instead, spend several weeks in preparation for this choice. Meet with your Dental CPA about any tax implications and ask if there is an optimal time to make such a purchase. Consider carefully the following factors to be sure you are choosing the right piece of equipment for your needs:

  • What is the main purpose of this equipment?
  • What features do you want/need it to have?
  • Are you and your team going to need extensive training to use it?
  • How often is this equipment going to be used?
  • Will it fit the space available?
  • Will you have to make changes to the space to use this equipment (ie, wiring, utility connections, etc)?
  • Is the manufacturer reliable?
  • Does the manufacturer provide good service for their equipment?
  • How long should this equipment last?
  • What is the expected benefit of this upgrade?
  • When do you plan to have it installed and in use?
  • If this equipment is to allow new services, is there a demand for those services in your practice/community?
  • Will your pricing for your services offset the investment cost and still be competitive in your market?
  • If the equipment you are buying is used, have you obtained an independent opinion on its condition?
  • How does the cost compare to other models? Other manufacturers?
  • Can you purchase directly from the manufacturer to save on cost?
  • Have you compared pricing from a variety of sources online?

While not all of these may apply to your equipment purchase in every circumstance, it should be clear that major dental office equipment should never be bought on impulse or without thorough consideration and research. Recommendations from other dentists or your dental CPA can also be helpful in narrowing your search.

Your dental equipment plays a vital role in the quality of care you are able to provide to your patients. When it is time to add or replace a piece of that equipment, make sure you take plenty of time to research, refine, and select the right piece for your practice. This will help you be certain that your investment will bring value to your practice for years to come.

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Data Security Best Practices

DSO in Chicago, IL

DSO in Chicago ILThough most of the attacks making headlines are those aimed at large organizations or political groups, roughly a third of all data security breaches in the last few years have occurred in the health care industry. Of these, employee error caused three times as many breaches as external attacks. In addition, more than half of the businesses who experience a security breach have fewer than 1,000 employees.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) requires all health care providers to take steps to protect the private information of their patients from hackers, thieves, and staff. While no data security system is foolproof, there are some best practices that can help to decrease your risk of an information breach, especially from employee error. Here are some of the best practices you should be enforcing:

  • All computers should be placed where screens are not visible to patients or visitors.
  • Every computer should have an encrypted password for access.
  • All passwords should contain a mixture of letters, numbers, and/or symbols and should be changed regularly.
  • Passwords should never be written down in any place accessible by the public. It is preferable that they not be written down at all.
  • Every staff member must be fully educated about the importance of data security practices, their responsibility to follow these practices, and the potential repercussions for failing to comply.
  • Office computers and internet should not be used to check personal email or visit non-work-related websites.
  • Ensure all firewalls, software, and operating systems are kept up to date.
  • Wireless networks should be shielded from public view.
  • Every computer should have antivirus software installed and kept up to date.
  • Do not access office data remotely from a shared computer or unknown WiFi network.
  • Smartphones, tablets, laptops that have access to any work systems or emails should be password protected in case lost or stolen.
  • All hard copies of patient data should be shredded.
  • All transmitted data should be encrypted.
  • Sensitive information, such as social security numbers, financial data, or other private information, should never be sent through email or instant messaging services.
  • Consider purchasing cyber insurance protection.
  • If a breach does occur, take appropriate action immediately. Contact your legal counsel for advice.

Your first and best defense against the theft of sensitive patient information is the integration of data security best practices into your practice policies. Meet with your team to discuss any changes you need to make and your expectations of compliance. Protect yourself, your team, and your patients by working to protect the integrity of your systems.

Contact our office for more information.

How Team Morale Can Make or Break Your Dental Practice

DSO in Chicago, IL

Team morale can make or break your dental practice. It’s a bold statement, but there are several reasons why it is true. The morale of every member of your team impacts other team members, your patients, and over time, even your bottom line. If you want your dental practice to be a success, team morale needs to be a priority.

Unhappy staff are less productive. When a member of your team is unhappy in their job, they work more slowly, are less efficient, and are less likely to “go the extra mile” to ensure a great patient experience. When an unhappy staff member isn’t giving a great patient experience, that patient is less likely to be a repeat patient and unlikely to refer anyone else to your practice. Over time, this could potentially cost you dozens of patients and thousands of dollars.

Unhappy staff make other staff unhappy. When one person is feeling unmotivated, unappreciated, or disgruntled, their attitude affects those around them. Other staff are forced to work harder to compensate for the lack of productivity. One person complaining about being unhappy can hurt the morale of every other person in your office. What starts as a seemingly small problem can quickly gain momentum if it isn’t addressed quickly and correctly.

Unhappy staff are more likely to quit. On the surface, this may seem like a good thing: take the poor attitude and low morale out of the equation. However, the cost of finding, hiring, and training a replacement can be high. Even more, the most common reason why an employee quits a job is that they feel unappreciated and/or unsupported by management. Chances are good that if one of your staff feels that way, others aren’t far behind.

Overcome team morale issues with good leadership. As the dentist and CEO of the practice, you are the primary person your team is looking to for leadership. Hold yourself accountable to your team for following through on your promises. Deal with conflicts as soon as they arise. Have an open door policy that makes your staff feel comfortable coming to you with problems so you can address them before they become unmanageable.

Hold regular effective team meetings to ensure every team member understands their place in your vision for the practice. Recognize individual and team successes. Show appreciation. Ensure that you are supportive of any staff empowered to make decisions. If you need to coach them on a change in policy, do so privately to avoid undermining their authority.

You are the leader of your team. The trust, support, recognition, appreciation, and respect you give to your team is the foundation of your team’s morale. When you create a great working environment, your team morale is high. High team morale creates a better patient experience and greater productivity, which benefits everyone. To ensure your practice thrives, make your team’s morale a priority. Contact our office today.

Why Your Practice Needs Effective Team Meetings

DSO in Chicago, IL

DSO in Chicago ILRegular effective team meetings can play a crucial role in the health of your dental practice. That one simple-sounding factor can impact every aspect of your business. Your people, your patients, and your practice all benefit from regular effective team meetings.

Your people need team meetings. The core of your practice is your vision, your goals, and your strategy for achieving your goals. Each member of your team needs to understand all of these things and, just as importantly, needs to understand their part in your plan. Without that understanding, your team is working blindly and is unable to actively contribute toward reaching your goals for your business.

A team meeting is an ideal format for open discussion about your vision, goals, and strategy. Not only can you use this discussion to ensure every member is clear on your expectations, but you may find that their unique perspective creates an exchange of ideas on more effective ways to reach your goals and how each person can best contribute.

While not every team meeting needs to include high-level discussion of vision, goals, and strategy, it is a good idea to include this at least once or twice a year and when bringing a new employee into the team. Additionally, many successful dentists find that it is highly useful to touch on how the strategies are being implemented and to discuss any measurable progress toward goals on at least a monthly basis. This helps to keep your team engaged and motivated toward achievement.

Your patients need team meetings. One of the most common components of an effective team meeting is education. Your team needs to know what the policies are, what is on the agenda for the day, if there are any specials being offered, if anyone is sick or on vacation. Any new ideas, training, or techniques that can be shared should be. Your patients need to know they will be given correct and consistent information from any member of your team. Make sure everyone is on the same page.

Your practice needs team meetings. Teach your team how to ask patients for referrals. Word of mouth can have a huge impact on your new customer base. Even happy, satisfied patients rarely refer anyone unless asked to do so, according to a recent study. Your team members should be engaging your patients in every interaction to ensure a positive experience and should be able to ask for referrals when patients are pleased.

Only you can review your practice, your time, and your schedules to determine when and how frequently you should hold team meetings. Whether you meet daily, weekly, or on some other timeline, make your meetings regular and effective. You will see benefits to your team, your patient experience, and your practice.

Contact our office for more information.

Dental Performance Institute Building Client Base in Ohio Market

Chicago DSO

Continually building / growing dental businesses locally, regionally, and nationally!

 

Dental Performance Institute is based in Illinois and is excited to announce that we are expanding and working to build a base of clients and Trusted Advisory Partners in the Ohio market. Dentists, Specialists, Oral Surgeons, Dental Executives, Private Equity firms, companies that cater specifically to the dental practice, specialty practice, group practice, multi-site business, etc.

Interested in hearing about our services and how they can assist you and/or your dental clients in increasing revenues, locating equity within the operational modules and/or referral base, strengthening, standardizing and organizing operations and team dynamics, or Starting up a New Practice properly? Please call Diana at (O) 630-549-3224 or e-mail Diana@DentalPerformanceInstitute.com.

Dental Performance Institute New Practice Start-up Program

Dental Performance Institute

Chicago, IL

Your ideal location is chosen, lease is signed, sealed, and delivered, and the build-out is underway. Now is the time that our team immediately starts working with you to get your practice infrastructure, logistics, and operations in place prior to your Grand Opening!!

Q. What happens after I open? Does Dental Performance Institute continue to consult and coach us throughout the first 6-12 months?

A. Absolutely

The first few months after opening is when you, the practitioner and your team are working diligently to find your place in your dental world…your practice. You’re getting an idea as to the lay of the land, getting to know your team and their personalities, getting a feel for the equipment and practice software, observing and tweaking the previously implemented operational modules. Everything is taking shape. You’re getting into a routine. But, are the implemented operational modules, the logistics, and the team dynamics taking ‘proper’ shape?? This is where we continue to work with you, your team and practice. We schedule a handful of days with you while working with patients to observe your environment, course correct or make enhancements where needed to keep you on track.

Dental Performance Institute’s main focus is the growth of your practice and the success of it in the future. To inquire about our New Practice Start-Up Program e-mail us at Diana@DentalPerformanceInstitute.com or call us at 630-549-3224. http://www.DentalPerformanceInstitute.com

Dental Performance Institute Offers ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’ – BOSI Profile Assessment Program

Dental Consultant in South Elgin, IL

DSO in Chicago ILDental Performance Institute is offering a program tailored to assist the dental practitioner and dental business owner in understanding his/her Entrepreneurial DNA by completing and understanding BOSI’s Profile Assessments.

As a Certified Partner of BOSI Performance, (home of the book Entrepreneurial DNA), Dental Performance Institute is equipped to help the dental practitioner generate breakthrough success in their business while surrounding themselves with team members who will work with them to achieve their goals. BOSI stands for Builder, Opportunist, Specialist, and Innovator, which are the 4 behavioral DNA’s of an entrepreneur. BOSI’s research proved the simple but critical fact that not all dental entrepreneurs are the same. Each dentist possesses unique business traits and capacity.

“We are looking to assist the dental practitioner in understanding their specific business behavioral characteristics so they know which direction to take when focusing on certain operational aspects of building a successful practice.” says Dental Performance Institute founder Diana Thompson.

Discovering one’s Entrepreneurial DNA is the first critical step in understanding why certain operational areas of their dental business are not functioning at the levels they should. One’s distinct BOSI Profile will help determine entrepreneurial tendencies, strengths, and growth areas and will assist in choosing team members who compliment specific business behaviors. Whether one needs to optimize results within their current business plan or create a mapped strategic plan for a new venture, Dental Performance Institute will work with the dental practitioner and their team to formulate a game plan – mapped to their ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’.

Contact our office for more information.

Are All Dentists’ ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’ the same?

If I had a dime for every time I was asked these three questions, I would be comfortably wealthy.

“Why is it that the dentist down the street is doing well operating his/her practice and I am struggling to make mine a success? We have the same sized practices and are operating them the same way!”

or

“I have a revolving door when it comes to my staff. How do I hire the right people to work with me?”

or

“My business partner and I agreed to part ways. Why is it that a large percentage of dental partnerships fail?”

 The Answer

Because there is no longer a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to operating a dental business, hiring the right team to complement or add to the success of that business, or choosing the ‘right’ dentist as a business partner. Let me explain.

I looked up the definition of an entrepreneur in The Merriam-Webster Dictionary. It reads, One who organizes and assumes the risk of a business or enterprise.’ So I think it is safe to say that the majority of dentists, who own and/or operate a practice or business, are entrepreneurs.

For many years, dental entrepreneurs have been placed in a jumbo box with the belief system that the techniques used or followed to operate a business; hire the right team members, and possibly form a partnership should be approached the same way, with the same methodology. This thought process and direction is just not true anymore because not everyone is genetically built the same way. Unfortunately, this notion has put some practices and companies out of business.

Point to ponder – Is Donald Trump the same entrepreneur as Richard Branson? Is Richard Branson the same entrepreneur as Dr. Oz? Is Dr. Oz the same entrepreneur as Steve Jobs? Think about their business behaviors, how they started out, the product or service they brought to market, and the road they chose to make a name for product and/or service.

In the 21st century, a new and different model, focusing on the approach and understanding of entrepreneurship is finally shedding its light. It’s called ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’ also called your ‘BOSI Profile’. BOSI stands for Builder, Opportunist, Specialist, and Innovator. ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’ and the BOSI Profile help the dental entrepreneur discover their distinct ‘mode of operation’ in both their business and personal life. So what are the characteristics of each profile?

The Builder or B DNA make up 10% of business owners. These are individuals who create highly scalable companies and grow them to millions (and billions) of dollars in revenues almost effortlessly. They are built to deploy high-growth systems and lead large teams.

The Opportunist or O DNA make up around 30% of business owners. They are drawn to ground floor opportunities and tend to dabble in multiple industries, often at the same time.

The Specialist or S DNA represents around 45% of all business owners. They go through years of schooling, apprenticeship or on-the-job training to develop expertise in an area. They tend to pick an industry and stay in it for 10-30 years.

The Innovator or I DNA make up around 15% of business owners. These are the ‘mad scientists’. They want to change the world with their innovation. They would much rather be in the lab of their business than in the office or around business operations.

These definitions offer a brief explanation to get you started on the path to discovering your unique ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’, while learning how to make it work specifically for you in your dental business and life.

What do you think your unique ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’ is? You can find out by completing your complimentary assessment at *BOSI Initial Assessment.

“Mr. and Ms. Dental Entrepreneur; you are unique. Your distinctive BOSI ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’ has and will continue to shift into action whenever a decision is being made. To make the right decisions, you must Discover your specific primary and secondary ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’ traits, understand the strengths and weakness of each, Design a plan of action just for you, and Deploy your customized plan into your marketplace. If you are interested in enhancing your current business plan or creating an action plan to work with your new business venture based specifically to your ‘Entrepreneurial DNA’, Dental Performance Institute can assist you.”

Contact our office for more information.